Instituto de Seguridad Laboral

Habilitación Plataforma de Contenedores Para Cloud-Native Apps

Cliente:

Instituto de Seguridad Laboral

El Reto:

La adopción de tecnologías basadas en contenedores, el correcto entendimiento de estos, así como también de las herramientas que son necesarias para su funcionamiento óptimo.

Nuestra Propuesta:

Se propone entonces una metodología donde se habilite al equipo en este tipo de tecnologías. La idea es capacitar tanto para el equipo de desarrollo como para el equipo de explotación en cómo utilizar contenedores.

Sobre el Instituto de Seguridad Laboral

for the provision of public health services for all people living in Ireland, the Health Service Executive manages a varied range of programmes and services across the country, working in close partnership with the Department of Health and other agencies. Additionally, the website hse.ie provides important resource links, information and health advice for the Irish public.

The challenge

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept the globe and hard-hit countries across Europe took increasingly bold measures to ‘flatten the curve’, the HSE explored new tools and resources to help manage the disease and bolster the health system in Ireland.

The use of existing Bluetooth technology in smartphones to support contact tracing — considered one of the most important activities for controlling the spread of coronavirus — emerged as a potentially life-saving option. So the HSE began looking for a partner to develop a contact tracing app for Ireland, one that would be reliable, secure and easy for the public to use. And it needed to be built in just weeks.

The kickoff

The sun was shining the afternoon of Sunday, 22 March, when NearForm got a call from the HSE. They wanted to build a contact tracing app for Ireland and had heard we have the capability and expertise to develop one quickly and to the highest quality.

The team came together that same afternoon, setting up a virtual command centre and kicking off a fully remote, design-led workshop with the HSE and Department of Health to outline the requirements, scope and functionality of the app. We relied on the same tools we use every day as a dispersed company, collaborating and communicating using Zoom and Miro, as well as Sketch and InVision for prototyping.

«El proyecto se ejecutó integrando a los equipos de desarrollo, arquitectura y operaciones, recogiendo dudas que surgieron en el proceso. El equipo de Andes respondió con claridad y en un lenguaje simple, gestionando el cambio exitosamente.»

A broad, collaborative team including NearForm, the HSE, Department of Health, Office of the Government Chief Information Officer (OGCIO), An Garda Síochána and more quickly identified the user needs and data concerns for the app, and got to work. It was widely reported that the code for Singapore’s app would be open-sourced for other governments to replicate; however, that process was ongoing. The decision was made to start with a fresh build.

The team pushed hard into the night and Monday morning presented a prototype with a full user journey and onboarding sequence. We now had the basis of a working app that could be scrutinised and tested.

El Proceso

From the start of our work with the HSE, NearForm followed the same design and development process we’ve honed through years of working with global enterprises. Collaboration was key, and communication was transparent and constant.

 

Everyone across the broader team agreed that this app needed to be built quickly, but more importantly it needed to be built right. Protecting the privacy and anonymity of users was paramount, and the reliability of close contact data was the focus. The app had to benefit the Irish contact tracing team and provide real support to the overall effort to protect Ireland’s residents.


Like that of so many countries, the initial solution worked on the centralised data model, in which app data was stored in a central database. However, the team met with obstacles that could not be resolved, both technical and privacy-related. The Bluetooth proximity detection feature on certain smartphones would not work if the phones were locked, for example, while in a pocket or handbag. And the prospect of collecting and storing user data, even if it was anonymised, raised too many privacy concerns.


When the team reached out to Apple and Google to try to find a way around the technical issues, we learned the two companies were coming together to create a solution that would address not just the tech but the privacy problems as well. Due to be released in May, the joint Apple-Google application programming interface (API) would allow governments and health authorities to build apps according to a decentralised data model and specifically enable Bluetooth proximity detection on locked phones as long as users had Bluetooth turned on.


The team decided to switch models and secured beta access to the new technology from Apple and Google. Moving as quickly as ever, we redesigned the user onboarding flow and created a new working prototype. Dublin-based quality assurance firm Expleo worked with the HSE and An Garda Síochána to conduct user testing of the app, focusing especially on testing the Exposure Notification System (ENS) within the Apple-Google solution.

Within three months of that first phone call from the HSE, the team had a secure, tested, user-friendly, reliable contact tracing app that worked and was ready to be deployed on a national scale.

Las Tecnologías Utilizadas

Red Hat OpenShift
Red Hat Satellite
ElasticSearch
Fluentd
Kibana

Los Resultados

From the start of our work with the HSE, NearForm followed the same design and development process we’ve honed through years of working with global enterprises. Collaboration was key, and communication was transparent and constant.

Everyone across the broader team agreed that this app needed to be built quickly, but more importantly it needed to be built right. Protecting the privacy and anonymity of users was paramount, and the reliability of close contact data was the focus. The app had to benefit the Irish contact tracing team and provide real support to the overall effort to protect Ireland’s residents.

Like that of so many countries, the initial solution worked on the centralised data model, in which app data was stored in a central database. However, the team met with obstacles that could not be resolved, both technical and privacy-related.